Phil Brodie Band "Muso" Page
.Started June 2015.
NEW FACTS MOST DAYS

THIS IS A NEW PAGE ... NEW FACTS EVERY WEEK

IN MUSIC
IT'S BANNED

MISC
* The work of Ewan MacColl was banned by the BBC owing to his sympathies with communism.
* Ten of the twelve tracks on humorist Tom Lehrer's 1953 album "Songs by Tom Lehrer" were banned for being too satirical.

* Late September of 1997, the Irish Independent Radio Commission placed a ban on radio stations playing any songs by Eurovision Song Contest winner Dana. It was seen to be giving her an unfair advantage during the election campaign she was involved with.

** ALBUMS
*** VIDEOS

A

"A Day in the Life" – The Beatles (1967) ... BBC - suggestive line, "..we’d love to turn you on..”
"A Pair of Brown Eyes" - The Pougues ... BBC's
Top of the Pops - a music video ban
"A Rose and a Baby Ruth" – George Hamilton IV (1956) ... BBC - thought to be advertising, although the candy bar Baby Ruth was not sold in the UK
"A Russian Love Song" – The Goons (1957) ... BBC - ridicules the cold war
"A Theme from the Threepenny Opera (Mack the Knife)" – Louis Armstrong (1956) ... banned by: NYC radio, BBC - bloodthirsty words
*** "A Whiter Shade Of Pale" - Procol Harum (1967) ... Top Of The Pops - the usage of Vietnam War newsreel footage.
"A Worried Man" – The Kingston Trio (1959) ... BBC - didn’t like the word “closet” being used for “cupboard”.
"A-huggin' and A-chalkin'" – Johnny Mercer (1946) ... BBC /USA - offensive to fat people
**
"All For You" - Janet Jackson (2001) ... Singapore - lyrics to 'Would You Mind', were too sexually explicit and not acceptable to their society
"Anarchy in the UK" - Sex Pistols (1976) ... BBC - banned following their controversial appearance on the TV news programme, Today.
"Annie Had A Baby" - Hank Ballard & The Midnighters (1954) ... banned for radio play by the FCC. overtly sexual lyrics
"Annie's Aunt Fannie" - Hank Ballard & The Midnighters
(1954) ... banned for radio play by the FCC. overtly sexual lyrics

"Angels in the Sky" – The Crew-Cuts (1955) ... BBC - Thought too offensive by the head of religious broadcasting
"Answer Me" – Frankie Laine (1953) ... BBC - objection by head of religious broadcasting as a "sentimental mockery of Christian prayer"
"Armchair Anarchist" - Kingmaker (1992) ... BBC/others - offensive lyrics "Bomb the idiots" and "Viva Dynamite"
** "As Nasty As They Wanna Be" (1989 album) - 2 Live Crew ... USA - Southern District of Florida ruled that the album was legally obscene.

B
"Baby Got Back" - Sir Mix-A-Lot (1992) ... MTV - briefly banned the outrageous video about women with big butts, and men who like them.
"Baby, Let Me Follow You Down" – Bob Dylan (1962) ... BBC - objection by head of religious broadcasting
"Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down) - Cher () ... BBC - banned during Gulf War
"Baubles, Bangles and Beads" – Kirby Stone Four (1958) ... BBC - "pop" version of classical piece, Alexander Borodin's String Quartet in D
"Be Prepared" – Tom Lehrer (1953) ... BBC - sexually suggestive
"Beep Beep" – The Playmates (1958) ... BBC - the mention of Cadillac and Nash Rambler considered advertising, also promoted dangerous driving.
"Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!" - The Beatles ... BBC - the phrase "Henry the Horse", contains two common slang terms for heroin.
"Big 6, Big 7,Big 8, 10 etc" - Judge Dredd (1972-75) ... BBC - sexual references and swear words.
"Big Boys Bickering" - Paul McCartney ... BBC - overtly political message
"Bitch" - The Rolling Stones ... many radio stations - sexual content and outrageous title.
"Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" – Ella Fitzgerald (1958) ... BBC - content where considered objectionable.
"Be Chrool To Your Scuel" - Twisted Sister (1985) ... MTV - banned the video for excessive violence and gore
"Blurred Lines" - Robin Thicke (2013) ... YouTube - banned the music video featuring nude models. (a new video was shot with clothed models)
"Bobby Brown" - Frank Zappa (1979) ... USA - sexually explicit lyrics
"Bring The Boys Home" - Freda Payne (1971) ... American Forces Network - fear that it would "give aid and comfort to the enemy"
"Body Language" - Queen (1982) ... MTV ... music video blatantly sexy and too racey
"Boom Bang-a-Bang" – Lulu (1969) ... BBC - banned during Gulf War
"Burn My Candle" – Shirley Bassey (1956) ... BBC - risqué connotations

C
"(Celebrate) The Day After You" – The Blow Monkeys and Curtis Mayfield (1987) ... Australia, BBC
Can't Stand Losing You - The Police (1978) ... BBC - morbid content (teenager who commits suicide)
Cardiac Arrest - Madness (1981) ... BBC - lyrical content, "gasping for the hot air, but the chest pain it won't go" etc
"Charlie Brown" – The Coasters (1959) ... BBC - the "disgusting, delinquent word" spitball
"Come Together" – The Beatles (1970) ... BBC - product placement with the lyrics "He shoot Coca-Cola"
"Come Again" – Au Pairs (1981) BBC ... refers to orgasms
"Cop Killer" - Body Count (1992) ... USA / New Zealand - vile messages and promoting anti-police sentiment.
”Cortez The Killer” - Neil Young (1975) ... some Spanish speaking countries/stations - criticism of one of their national heroes
"Cradle Song (Brahms' Lullaby)" – Frank Sinatra (1944) ... BBC - disrespectful to classical music
"Croce di Oro (Cross of Gold)" – Joan Regan (1955) ... BBC - objection by head of religious broadcasting as sentimentalisation of religion
"Crazy Horses" - The Osmonds (1972) ... South Africa - "horses" is a slang term for heroin there, so it was thought to be referring to drugs.
"Crying in the Chapel" – Lee Lawrence (1953) ... BBC - objection by head of religious broadcasting because it was "nauseating".
"Cuddle Me" – Ted Heath ft Dennis Lotis (1954) ... BBC - lewd and suggestive

D
"Damn, I Wish I Was Your Lover" - Sophie B. Hawkins (1992) ... MTV - rejected the original version of the video on grounds of erotic content.
"Danny Boy" – Conway Twitty (1959) ... BBC - Conway Twitty holds the distinction of having recorded the only version of “Danny Boy” to have been banned!
"Deep in the Heart of Texas" – Bing Crosby and Woody Herman (1942) ... BBC - too infectious
"Devil Woman" - Marty Robbins ... Eire - adulterous theme
** "Devils and Dust" - Bruce Springsteen (2005 album) ... Starbucks, USA - concerns about adult content and his stances on corporate politics
"Diggin' My Potatoes" – Lonnie Donegan (1954) ... BBC - lyrics not suitable
"Ding-Dong! The Witch Is Dead" - Judy Garland ... BBC - found it disrespectful when a Facebook campaign and other anti-Thatcher camps tried do make the song a No.1 hit after the sad death of former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher.
"Dinner with Drac" – John Zacherle (1958) ... BBC - lyrics considered despicable
"Don't Let's Be Beastly to the Germans" – Noël Coward (1943) BBC ... WWII reminder of Germany
"Don't Stop (Wiggle Wiggle)" - The Outhere Brothers ... BBC / others - shockingly explicit
"Disarm" - Smashing Pumpkins (1994) BBC ... banned the song from appearing on Top of the Pops, because of the lyric "cut that little child".

E
"Ebeneezer Goode" – The Shamen (1992) ... BBC - drug fuelled song, "Eezer Goode..." in the chorus sounds like E's are good.
"Ebony Eyes" – The Everly Brothers (1961) ... BBC - death song, too morbid.
"Eight Miles High - The Byrds () ... USA - drug connotations in its lyrics.
** "Electric Ladyland" - Jimi Hendrix Experience (1968 album) ... many retail stores - the cover depicted nineteen nude women lounging in front of a black background.
"Eve of Destruction" – Barry McGuire (1965) ... BBC - on the restricted list, for its bombast; USA - "it was an aid to the enemy in Vietnam"

F
"F--k tha Police" - N.W.A (1988) ... USA / other countries - encouraged violence against, and disrespect for, law enforcement officers.
"Fairytale of New York" – The Pogues ft Kirsty MacColl (1987) - BBC/UK MTV - banned the words "faggot" and "slut"
"Fat Bottomed Girls" - Queen (1978) ... Shops and Stores - the cover featured a nude woman riding a bicycle; the new version was the same image with panties drawn over the woman.
"Feel Good Hit Of The Summer" - Queens of the Stone Age (2000) ... many radio stations / Wal-Mart - the lyrics list drugs: nicotine, valium, vicodin, ecstasy, marijuana, alcohol and cocaine
"French Kiss" – Lil Louis (1989) ... BBC - too much heavy breathing

G
"Gimme a Pigfoot (And a Bottle of Beer)" – Bessie Smith (1933) ... BBC - unsuitable content
"Girl Don't Come" - Sandie Shaw (1964) ... Because of this song although it reached number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100, Sandy was unable to do US promotion – including a Shindig! appearance scheduled for March – due to the U.S. Federation of TV and Radio Artists refusing her a US work permit
"Give Ireland Back to the Irish" – Wings (1972) ... BBC - political, references to Northern Ireland.
"Glad to Be Gay" – Tom Robinson Band (1978) ... BBC - refernces to the gay community
"Gloomy Sunday" – Billie Holiday (1941) ... BBC - just.. bad taste!
"God Bless the Child" – Billie Holiday (1942) ... BBC - unsuitable for broadcast because of its title - prayers in popular music were not allowed.
"God Only Knows" - The Beach Boys (1966) ... Some USA radio stations - deemed as blasphamy having a pop song with God in the title. Because of this, it was released as the B-side of "Wouldn't It Be Nice" in the United States. In other countries, "God Only Knows" was the single's A-side.
"God Save the Queen" – Sex Pistols (1977) ... BBC - vulgar and offensive
Goodbye Earl - Dixie Chicks (1999) ... Some radio stations - stirred controversy for its take on spousal abuse and banned by several male radio programmers.
"Great Balls of Fire" - Jerry Lee Lewis () ... Some radio stations - sexual innuendoes
"Green Jeans" – The Flee-Rekkers (1960) ... BBC - mutilation of the classics, "distortion of melody, harmony and rhythm"
"Greensleeves" – The Beverley Sisters (1956) ... BBC - mutilation of the classics, "distortion of melody, harmony and rhythm"
"Guess Things Happen That Way" – Johnny Cash (1958) ... BBC - objected to by head of religious broadcasting
"Gypsy Roadhog - Slade (1977) ... BBC - references to drugs

H
"Hall Of The Mountain King" - Nero & The Gladiators (1961) ... BBC - the banning of pop versions of classical tunes policy.
"Have a Whiff on Me" – Mungo Jerry (1971) ... BBC - drug references
"Hard Headed Woman" – Elvis Presley (1958) ... BBC - religious theme, BUT it could be played, only with special permission
"He" – Al Hibbler/Robert Earl (1955) ... BBC - objected to by the head of religious broadcasting as being solely for commercial gain.
"He Bought My Soul At Calvary" - Jo Stafford (1951) ... BBC - objection by head of religious broadcasting as a 'misguided' presentation of the Gospel
"Hi, Hi, Hi" – Wings (1972) ... BBC - explicit sexual lyrics
"High Class Baby" – Cliff Richard and the Drifters (1958) ... BBC - considered to be advertising Cadillac cars
"Hold My Hand" – Don Cornell (1954) ... BBC - objection by head of religious broadcasting, a girlfriend cannot be compared to the "kingdom of heaven"
**"Holy Wood (In The Shadow Of The Valley Of Death)" - Marilyn Manson (2000 album) ... many retail stores - refused to stock the album, the cover art, depicting Manson on a crucifix
"Homosapien" - Pete Shelley (1982) ... BBC - banned because of the line "Homo superior in my interior"
"Honey Hush" – The Rock and Roll Trio/Johnny Burnette (1956) ... BBC - sexual lyrics and promotes violence.
"Honey Love" – Dennis Lotis (1954) ... BBC - objection by head of religious broadcasting, lewd and suggestive
"Honeycomb" – Jimmie Rodgers (1957) ... BBC - objection by head of religious broadcasting
"Honky Tonk Angel" - Cliff Richard (1975) ... Cliff found out a "honky tonk angel" was a hooker he withdrew the record.
"(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" – Frank Sinatra (1956) ... BBC - objection by head of religious broadcasting, lewd and suggestive
"House Of The Rising Sun" - Josh White ... BBC - lyrics about prostitution

I
"I Am the Walrus" – The Beatles (1967)
"I Can't Control Myself" – The Troggs (1966) ... BBC - sexual reference
"I Hear the Angels Singing" – Frankie Laine (1954)
"I Leaned on a Man" – Connie Francis (1957)
"I Want To Be Evil" – Eartha Kitt (1953) ... BBC - title and content where considered objectionable.
"I Want You to Be My Baby" – Annie Ross (1956)
"I Want Your Sex" - George Michael (1987) ... BBC - banned between the hours of 5:50am-9pm
"I Went to Your Wedding" – Spike Jones and His City Slickers (1953)
"I'll Be Home for Christmas" – Bing Crosby (1943)
"I'm Always Chasing Rainbows" – Perry Como (1949)/Ken Dodd (1963) ... BBC - "pop" version of a classical piece, Frédéric Chopin's Fantaisie-Impromptu.
"I'm Nobody's Baby" – Frankie Howerd (1948)
"Imagine" - John Lennon (1971) ... BBC - banned during the Gulf War
"In the Air Tonight" – Phil Collins (1981) ... BBC - banned during the Gulf War
"In the Beginning" – Frankie Laine (1955) ... BBC - objected to by the head of religious broadcasting
"In the Hall of the Mountain King" – Nero and the Gladiators (1961)
"Invisible Sun" – The Police (1981) ... BBC - due to the content of the song, violence and turmoil in Northern Ireland
"It Is No Secret" – Jo Stafford (1954)
"It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels" – Kitty Kallen (1962)
"It Would Be So Nice" – Pink Floyd (1968)
"I've Come of Age" – Billy Storm (1959)


J
"Jackie" – Scott Walker (1967) ... BBC - refers to "authentic queers"
"Je t'aime... moi non plus" – Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourg (1969) ... BBC - sexual references
"John and Marsha" – Stan Freberg (1950) ... BBC - sexual, too suggestive
"Johnny Remember Me" – John Leyton (1961) ... BBC - death song, too morbid.
"Jungle Fever" – The Chakachas (1972)
***"Justify My Love" - Madonna (1990 video) ... MTV - sexual content .

K
"Keep Me in Mind" – Lita Roza and Al Timothy (1955)
"Killing an Arab" – The Cure (1979) ... BBC - banned during the Gulf War
"Kodachrome" – Paul Simon (1973) ... BBC -
would not play the trademarked name.

L
"La Petite Tonkenoise" – Josephine Baker (1930)
"Lazy Mary" – Lou Monte (1958) ... BBC - Italian lyric deemed objectionable
"Leader of the Pack" – The Shangri-Las (1964) ... BBC - death song, too morbid.
"Let the People Go" – McGuinness Flint (1972)
"Let's Spend the Night Together" – The Rolling Stones (1967) ... BBC - encourages promiscuity
"Light a Candle in the Chapel" – Frank Sinatra (1942) ... BBC - objection by head of religious broadcasting, the song was "so nauseatingly sentimental that it debased the Christian religion".
"Light My Fire" – Jose Feliciano (1968) ... BBC - banned during the Gulf War
"Lili Marleen" – Lale Andersen (1939)
"Little Star" – The Elegants (1958) ... BBC - objection by head of religious broadcasting to use of God in a pop song.
"Louie Louie" - Kingsmen (1957) ... Indiana USA declared it pornographic
"Lola" – The Kinks (1970) ... BBC - banned for advertising coca cola, until they changed the lyrics.
"Louie Louie" - The Kingsmen (1963) ... USA - FBI investigation supposed obscenity of the lyrics, an investigation that ended without prosecution.
"Love for Sale" – Cole Porter (1930) / Ella Fitzgerald (1956) ... BBC - sexual references, prostitution.
"Love Is a Word" – Alma Cogan (1965)
"Love Is Strange" – Mickey & Sylvia (1956) ... BBC - the line "love is money in the hand" would encourage prostitution
"Love to Love You Baby" – Donna Summer (1975) ... BBC - too much heavy breathing, grunts and groans.
**
"Lovesexy" - Prince (1988 album) ... Shops around the world - nude photo of Prince on cover
"Lovin' Machine" – Wynonie Harris (1951) ... BBC - crude implications associated with a "lovin' machine"
"Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" – The Beatles (1967) ... BBC - drug refernces

M
"Mack the Knife" – Bobby Darin (1959) ... banned by: NYC radio, BBC - bloodthirsty words
"Made You" – Adam Faith (1960) ... BBC - sexual references
"Maggie May" – The Vipers Skiffle Group (1957) ... BBC - song is about a prostitute
"Maybellene" – Chuck Berry (1955)
"Mighty Mighty Man" – Bobby Darin (1958)
"Minnie the Moocher" – Cab Calloway (1931)
"Miss Morse" - Pearls Before Swine (1967) ... USA radio - Tom Rapp was singing F-U-C-K in Morse code
"Miss You" – Bing Crosby (1942) ... BBC - The War Office felt that it too sentimental and might lower morale at home
"Monster Mash" – Bobby "Boris" Pickett and the Crypt-Kickers (1962) ... BBC - it was offensive and in poor taste.
"Moonlight Love" – Perry Como (1956) ... BBC - mutilation of the classics, took it’s melody from Debussy
"My Christmas Prayer" – Billy Fury (1959) ... BBC - religious grounds.
"My Friend" – Eddie Fisher (1954)
"My Friend Jack" – The Smoke (1967)
"My Generation" - The Who (1965) ... BBC - initially refused to play the song because it might offend people who stutter.
"My Little Ukulele" – Joe Brown and The Bruvvers (1963) ... BBC - "too rique"

N
"Night of the Vampire" – The Moontrekkers (1961)
"Ninety-Nine Years (Dead or Alive)" – Guy Mitchell (1961)
"Nobody Loves Like an Irishman" – Lonnie Donegan (1958) ... BBC - Line about the Quran deemed to be offensive to Muslims

O
"(Oh) Pretty Woman" - Van Halen (1982) ... MTV aired the video very sparingly - too racey and distasteful
"Old Man Atom" – The Sons of the Pioneers (1950) ... BBC - Controversial topics such as the atom bomb
"One Has My Name (The Other Has My Heart)" – Jimmy Wakely (1948) ... BBC - encouraged adultery
"Open Your Box" - Yoko Ono Plastic Ono Band (1970) ... BBC - banned because of the line "Open your legs"
"Original Prankster" - The Offspring (2000) ... HMV stores - refused to stock the record after the band decided to give the track away as a free download on their official website, prior to it's release.

P
"Paper Doll" – The Mills Brothers (1943) ... BBC - theme of feminine unfaithfulness. deemed unacceptable during war time.
"Peaches" – The Stranglers (1977) ... BBC - too "woman baiting"
"Peaceful Street" – Ernest Butcher (1936)
**
"Permission To Land" - The Darkness (2003 album) ... Wal-Mart - the album sleeve featured a woman's bottom.
"Plastic Jesus" - King Earl Boogie Band ... BBC - on grounds of blasphemy.
"Please No Squeeza da Banana" – Louis Prima (1963)

Q

R

"Radio Times" – The BBC Dance Orchestra (1935)
"Randy Scouse Git" - The Monkees (19--) ... BBC - title was "actually somewhat taboo to the British audience" it was re-released as "Alternate Title"
"Reefer Man " - Fats Waller () ... BBC - drug references
"Relax" – Frankie Goes to Hollywood (1984) ... BBC - sexual references
"Rock You Sinners" – Art Baxter and His Rock 'n' Roll Sinners (1958)
"Rockin' Through The Rye" - Bill Haley and His Comets (1956)
... BBC - the song went against traditional British standards and used 50's hip slang.
"Rum and Coca-Cola" – The Andrews Sisters (1945) ... BBC - advertising Coca -Cola
”Rumble” - Link Wray (1959) ... USA certain stations - although an instrumental the title was thought too suggestive of teen violence.

S

"Sad Affair" – Marxman (1993) ... BBC - contains IRA slogan
"Saturday Nite at the Duckpond" – The Cougars (1963) ... BBC - "pop" versions of a classical piece
"Say a Prayer for the Boys Over There" – Deanna Durbin (1943)
"Send Me to the 'lectric Chair" – George Melly (1953)
"Shall We Take a Trip" – Northside (1990)
"She Had to Go and Lose It at the Astor" – Johnny Messner (1939)
"She Was Only a Postmaster's Daughter" – Durium Dance Band (1933)
**"Sheryl Crow" - Sheryl Crow (1996 album) ... Wal-Mart - The song "Love Is a Good Thing" contains the lyrics "Watch out sister, watch out brother, watch our children while they kill each other with a gun they bought at Walmart discount stores".
"Sincerely" – Liberace (1955) ... BBC -
"Sixty Minute Man" – The Dominoes (1951) ... BBC - sexually suggestive
"Song of India" – Tommy Dorsey (1938) ... BBC - because it was based on a classical work, Rimsky-Korsakov's Sadko.
"So What?" – Anti-Nowhere League (1981) ... BBC - obscene, contains the word fuck countless times, references to drugs, bestiality and STIs.
"Soldier" – Harvey Andrews (1972) ... BBC - lest feelings be exacerbated in the nationalist community of Northern Ireland, or the British public be incited to attack innocent Irish people. The Ministry of Defence still advises British soldiers not to sing the song in pubs
"Somebody Up There Likes Me" – Perry Como (1956) ... BBC - head of religious broadcasting objection .
"Spasticus Autisticus" - Ian Dury (1981) ... BBC - deemed the lyrics offensive
"Statue of Liberty" – XTC (1978) ... BBC - the lyrics "In my fantasy I sail beneath your skirt".
'Star Star' - Rolling Stones (1973) ... BBC - it contained the word "Star-fucker" in the chorus a dozen times.
"St. Therese of the Roses" – Malcolm Vaughan (1956) ... BBC - head of religious broadcasting felt it was contrary to Catholic and Protestant beliefs
"Stranger in Paradise" – The Four Aces (1953) ... BBC - "prohibited from broadcast due to unacceptable performance" disrespectful to the classics.
"Street Fighting Man" - Rolling Stones (1968) ... several radio stations in Chicago, IL. - Authorities feared it might incite public disorder.
"Such a Night" – Johnnie Ray (1954) ... BBC - lewd and suggestive
"Summer Smash" – Denim (1997) ... EMI self-banned - the planned release date was in the same period when Princess Diana died by a car crash.

T
"Teen Angel" – Mark Dinning (1959) ... BBC - death song, too morbid.
"Teenage Prayer" – Gale Storm (1955)
"Tell Laura I Love Her" – Ray Peterson/Ricky Valance (1960) ... BBC - death song, too morbid.
"Terry" – Twinkle (1964) ... BBC - death song, too morbid.
"The Ballad Of John and Yoko" - The Beatles ... Spain/USA various radio stations - mention of crucifixion offended radio listeners.
"The Battle of New Orleans" – Johnny Horton (1959)
"The Blue Danube" – Spike Jones and His City Slickers (1945) ... BBC - takes liberties with a serious work of music
"The Christening" – Arthur Askey (1943)
"The Cover of Rolling Stone" – Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show (1973)
"The Deck of Cards" – T. Texas Tyler (1948)
"The Devil Is a Woman" – Herb Jeffries (1957)
"The Foggy, Foggy, Dew" – Peter Pears (1950)
"The Garden of Eden" – Frankie Vaughan (1957) ... BBC - song is "fairly blasphemous"
"The Heel" – Eartha Kitt (1955)
"The Man with the Golden Arm" – Eddie Calvert (1956) ... BBC - although it's an instrumental, the BBC objected to the sordid nature of the film!!
"The Mocking Bird" – The Four Lads (1952)
"The Monster Mash" - Bobby (Boris) Pickett and the Crypt-Kickers (1962) ... BBC - too morbid
*** "The Next Day" - David Bowie (2013 video) ... Youtube (temporarily) - its graphic content
"The Old Dope Peddler" – Tom Lehrer (1953)
"The Reefer Song (If You're a Viper)" – Fats Waller (1943)
"The Sabre Dance" – Woody Herman (1948)
"The Shag (Is Totally Cool)" – Billy Graves (1958) ... BBC - the shag is a dance, but also it is slang for sexual intercourse
"The Silver Madonna" – Kirk Stevens (1957)
"The Sky" – Petula Clark (1957)
"The Story of a Starry Night" – Glenn Miller (1954) ... BBC - distorted representation of the original Tchaikovsky's Sixth Symphony
"The Story Of My Life" - Alma Cogan (1958) ... BBC - too morbid, refers to death
"The Story of Three Loves" – Ray Martin (1957)
"The Test of Time" – Robert Earl (1959)
"The Tommy Rot Story" – Morris & Mitch (1957)
"The Unbeliever" – Guy Mitchell (1957)
"The Voice in My Heart" – Eydie Gormé (1958)
"The Winker's Song" - Ivor Biggun (1978) ... BBC - sexual references
"They're Coming to Take Me Away Ha-Haaa!" – Napoleon XIV (1966)
"Three Stars" – Ruby Wright (1959)
"Til the Following Night" – Screaming Lord Sutch (1961)
"Till the End of Time" – Perry Como (1945)
"Ting Tong Tang" – Ken Platt (1958)
"To Keep My Love Alive" – Ella Fitzgerald (1956)
"Toll the Bell Easy" – Les Hobeaux (1957)
"Too Drunk to Fuck" – Dead Kennedys (1981)
"Tribute to Buddy Holly" – Mike Berry and The Outlaws (1961)

U
”Unknown Soldier” - The Doors () ... USA - political, the song’s anti-war stance.
"Urban Guerrilla" – Hawkwind (1973)

V

W
"Wake Up Little Suzie" - Everley Brothers ... USA certain stations - would influence and corrupt teenagers.
"Walk Hand in Hand" – Tony Martin (1956) ... BBC - religous reasons, disrespectful to God.
"We Call It Acieeed" – D-Mob (1988)
"We Can't Let You Broadcast That" – Norman Long (1932) ... BBC - made fun of the BBC's policies of 'banning' recordings
"(We Don't Need This) Fascist Groove Thang" – Heaven 17 (1981) ... BBC - concerns by Radio 1's legal department that it libeled Reagan.
"We Have to Be So Careful" – The Beverley Sisters (1953) ... BBC - because it ridiculed BBC policy
"We Will All Go Together When We Go" – Tom Lehrer (1959)
"Wet Dream" – Max Romeo (1969) ... BBC - due to its lyrics which are of an explicit sexual nature
"When I'm Cleaning Windows" – George Formby (1936) ... BBC - Sexual innuendo, too racy, "A disgusting little ditty"
"Whoa Buck" – Lonnie Donegan (1959)
"With My Little Stick of Blackpool Rock" – George Formby (1937)
"With My Little Ukelele in Hand" – George Formby (1933)
"Woman Love" – Gene Vincent (1956) ... BBC - lyrics offensive and can't be understood.
"Work With Me, Annie" - Hank Ballard & the Midnighters (1954) ... banned for radio play by the FCC. overtly sexual lyrics
"Worried Man" - Kingston Trio (1959) ... BBC - didn’t like the word “closet” being used for “cupboard”.

X

Y
"You'll Get Yours" – Frank Sinatra (1956)
*** "You're All I Need" - Mötley Crüe (1987 video) ... MTV - because of the level of violence.
Z

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